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Publications 2011

PUBLICATIONS IN 2011

 

ISI-CITED JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS in 2011

Field of Research

1

Applied Linguistics

Reference

Azirah Hashim and Norizah Hassan. 2011. Language of the Legal Process; An Analysis of Interactions in the Syariah Court, Multilingua, Vol. 30, 3-4, pp. 333-356.

Abstract

This study examines interactions from trials in the Syariah court in Malaysia. It focuses on the types of questioning, the choice of language and the linguistic resources employed in this particular context. In the discourse of law, questioning has been a prominent concern particularly in cross-examination and can be considered one of the key communicative practices in legal encounters. Usually based on expectations and assumptions about what the responses are likely to be, an extended question and answer dialogue can allocate or remove blame and make a party appear trustworthy or unreliable. Questions which are supportive of witnesses can simply ask for confirmation, leading witnesses through straightforward narratives and information-seeking questions. On the other hand, questions during cross-examination create a negative evaluation of witnesses and defendants, destroying their credibility and casting doubts on defence statements. Data are collected from a Syariah court in the country and examined for the strategic lexical choices, specific linguistic resources, including code-switching, through which utterances are constructed as questions and how questions are sequenced in this particular context.

Link

http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/mult.2011.016

2

Applied linguistics

Reference

Bahrani, T., & Tam, S, S. (2011). Technology and language learning: Exposure to TV and radio news and speaking proficiency. Kritika Kultura (17): 144-160.

Abstract

Today, technology has dominated the world by extensive improvements in audio/visual mass media such as TV and radio. TV and radio are not just entertainment tools anymore. It can be used as pedagogically valuable technology that can provide authentic language input for language learning. In the same line, this study examined the effect of exposure to TV and radio news on improving EFL learners’ speaking proficiency. To achieve this purpose, a speaking proficiency test was administered to two hundred language learners and ultimately sixty intermediate language learners were selected and randomly divided into group one and group two. During the experiment, group one participants had exposure to TV and radio news to work on in-and out-side the classroom while the participants in group two had only exposure to a sample selected utterances extracted from different kinds of TV and radio programs other than news. At the end of the experiment, both groups took another sample speaking proficiency test to see whether or not any significant improvements happened in their speaking proficiency. The results obtained from the post-test indicated that group one participants performed better than group two participants. This was indicative of the fact that exposure to TV and radio news promotes EFL learners’ speaking proficiency.

Link

http://kritikakultura.ateneo.net/issue/no-17/new-scholars-forum/technology-and-language-learning-exposure-to-tv-and-radio-news-and-speaking-proficiency

3

Education

 

 

Reference

Chua, Y.P., Tie, F. H., & Don, Z.M. 2011. Creating an Education Research Acculturation Theory for Research Implementation in School. Education and Urban Society, pp.1-21.

Abstract

This study investigates the implementation of educational research among urban secondary schools in Malaysia. The respondents include school teachers and administrators, lecturers in education institutions, and committee members of the state education departments. Data collected from interviews were coded and analyzed using open, axial and selected coding procedures. Six core categories emerged from the data namely implementation initiative, implementation obstacles, collaboration, research knowledge, research needs, and suggestions to overcome the weaknesses. The findings showed that the quality and quantity of education research in school depend on the existence of a research culture. The findings of this study form an education research acculturation theory for research implementation in schools.

Link

doi:10.1177/0013124511413124

http://eus.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/07/28/0013124511413124.full.pdf

4

Sociolinguistics

Reference

Coluzzi Paolo, 2011. Majority and Minority Language Planning in Brunei Darussalam, Language Problems and Language Planning, pp. 35, 3.

Abstract

This paper is an overview of language planning as carried out in Brunei Darussalam for Malay, its official language, English, its de facto other official language, and for the other eleven minority languages spoken in the country. After a general introduction to the country and its sociolinguistic situation, the paper outlines the main language planning activities carried out in Brunei through corpus, status and acquisition planning. The overview of status planning includes a brief description of the linguistic landscape of Brunei. The second part of the paper discusses the advantages of education using the students’ first language, something that is not happening in Brunei, and the future of education in the country after the introduction of the new education reform (SPN21). The paper closes with some general remarks on the importance of maintaining minority languages and some suggestions on how this can be achieved.

Link

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/lplp.35.3.02col

 

5

Others

 

 

Reference

David, M. K. & Yoong, D. (2011). Islamic activism: Anti-apostasy propaganda in the Lina Joy case. The Indian Journal of Social Work 72(2), pp.199-222.

Abstract

In early 2007, the legal case of Lina Joy’s conversion from Islam to Christianity was under both local and international media spotlight because it openly questions whether or not a Malaysian Muslim can become an apostate, by resorting to the High Court and bypassing the Syariah courts (Islamic courts). The issue was whether or not the Syariah courts supersede the highest court in Malaysia, the Federal Court. Joy’s case highlights whether a Malaysian Malay has constitutional freedom to choose one’s religion, as well as a non-Muslim life partner (Koshy, 2007). Since apostasy is a serious offence in Islam, conservative Muslims frown upon any attempts that would allow Muslims to renounce Islam, and Joy’s case is seen as a threat because it may provide an easy exit for Muslims to leave Islam by bypassing the Syariah court. Furthermore, conservative Malay Muslims claim that Joy, being a person of Malay heritage, threatens the Malay identity because the Federal Constitution states that a Malay has to be a Muslim. This research analyses the techniques used by PEMBELA, an Islamic activist group comprising of more than seventy Islamic Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs), to propagate their cause and solicit support from Muslims to oppose Joy’s victory. Jowett and O’Donnell’s (2005) content analysis is used to study the official leaflet distributed by PEMBELA.  

6

 

Others

Reference

Ding, Seong Lin, Ng Yean Leng. (2011). The China Image in Malaysian Chinese Literature. Foreign Literature Studies, 33(6):140-145.

Abstract

The “China Image” express in the Malaysian Chinese Literature has been under acute transformation over a long period of time. First of all, what is meant by “China”? Secondly different views held by various people with different identities and acquiescencemight bring to a complete diversion of “China image”. The changes of times and minds, or perhaps the different perspectives in thought and review angle might also lead to a distinctive conclusion. This paper intends to analyze from three perspectives so as to have a closer reading of the “China image” in the context of Malaysian Chinese Literature.

Link

http://caod.oriprobe.com/articles/28506862/The_China_Image_in_Malaysian_Chinese_Literature.htm

7

Discourse studies

Reference

Dumanig, F. and David, M.K. 2011. Conversion Narratives and Construction of Identity among Christians in Malaysia. Multilingua 30 (3-4), pp. 319-331.

Abstract

Conversion narratives in the form of testimony are powerful means of consolidating and strengthening one's new religious identity (Beit-Hallahmi, Prolegomena to the psychological study of religion, Bucknell University Press, 1989; Rambo, Understanding religious conversion, Yale University Press, 1993; Stromberg 1993, as cited in Emmons & Paloutzian, Annual Review of Psychology 54: 377–402, 2003). Using conversion narratives is common among Christians in testifying how they came to know Christ. The testimony usually presents two distinct identities of the speaker: before and after accepting Christ as Lord and savior. These two distinct identities are examined in this paper to see how speakers construct themselves in the form of testimony. This paper specifically analyzes the moves and lexical choices used in the narratives. To carry out the study, 15 recorded conversion narratives were used.

Link

DOI: 10.1515/mult.2011.015, August 2011

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/mult.2011.30.issue-3-4/mult.2011.015/mult.2011.015.xml

8

Education

Reference

Ghajarieh, A. B. B., & Kow, K. Y. C. 2011. Addressing Men and Gender Diversity in Education: A Promising Solution to the HIV/AIDS Epidemic. Health Care for Women International, 32(4), pp. 314-327.

Abstract

To date, researchers investigating gender in relation to social issues underscore women and appear to sideline men. Focusing on women in studies concerning sociogender issues may exclude not only men from mainstream research, but also those who do not fit into the binary gender system, including gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) people. One area closely related to gender issues is the HIV epidemic. Mainstream discussions of men and other versions of masculinity and femininity including GLBT people in the gender-related studies of the HIV epidemic can decrease the vulnerability of individuals against HIV infections regardless of their biological sex.

Link

doi: 10.1080/07399332.2010.532577

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/07399332.2010.532577

9

Discourse Studies

Reference

Kaur, J. 2011. Intercultural communication in English as a lingua franca: Some sources of misunderstanding. Intercultural Pragmatics, 8(1), pp. 93-116.

Abstract

Intercultural communication is perceived as being somewhat problematic, given the varied cultures that come into contact with one another. Misunderstanding and communication breakdown are said to mark many intercultural encounters as participants rely on the norms of their mother tongue and native culture to interpret meaning. This paper reports on the findings of a study conducted to identify and explain the sources and nature of misunderstanding in intercultural communication in English as a lingua franca. Fine-grained analyses of 15 hours of naturally occurring spoken interactions in ELF reveal that none of the misunderstandings occurring in this type of intercultural communication can be attributed to differences in the participants' cultural background. While a few misunderstandings are language-related, the source of many of the misunderstandings can be traced to ambiguity in the speaker's utterances. Other reasons for misunderstanding include mishearing and lack of world knowledge, namely, factors that also contribute to misunderstanding in intracultural communication. It is suggested that the diminished role of culture in such interactions stems from the lingua franca context of the interaction. Intent on arriving at mutual understanding in a language that is native to none of the participants, cultural differences are tolerated and often overlooked as the participants negotiate and co-construct understanding in the lingua franca.

Link

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/iprg.2011.8.issue-1/iprg.2011.004/iprg.2011.004.xml

10

Discourse Studies

Reference

Kaur, J. 2011. Raising explicitness through self-repair in English as a lingua franca. Journal of Pragmatics, 43(11), pp. 2704-2715.

Abstract

A key feature of interaction in English as a lingua franca (ELF) is diversity – in the varieties of English spoken, the levels of proficiency displayed and the cultural norms and communicative styles of the participants – which can pose challenges to the process of achieving shared understanding in talk. Research into ELF, however, shows that participants make adept use of interactional practices to both pre-empt and resolve problems of understanding. Additionally, speakers use various “explicitness strategies” (Mauranen, 2007) to enhance the clarity of utterances and promote the comprehensibility of speech. This paper examines further the notion of raising explicitness of expression by looking at some of the self-repair practices of speakers using ELF. Using conversation analysis procedures, 15 h of audio-recorded naturally occurring ELF conversations of international graduate students were analyzed for this purpose. Instances of self-initiated repair were examined to identify the types of repair performed and the kinds of trouble addressed. The results show that in addition to correcting, the participants employ a variety of self-repair practices that make utterances explicit and improve communicative clarity. The speakers’ meticulous attention to clarity and explicitness possibly stems from an awareness of the precarious nature of the ELF situation.

Link

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378216611001317

11

Discourse Studies

Reference

Lean, M.L. 2011. A visual analysis of festive television commercials in Malaysia, Multilingua (Special Issue) Journal of Cross-Cultural and Interlanguage Communication. 30, pp. 305-317.

Abstract

Malaysia is a multiracial country with a diverse range of religions, leading to a broad range of religious festivals throughout the year. In recent years, corporate giants such as Petronas, Telekom Malaysia (TM), Tenaga and Astro have taken to airing television commercials (TVCs) that contain a local touch when greeting their customers. Perhaps the TVCs that have noticeably touched the hearts of most Malaysians are those sponsored by Petronas. Petronas used to commission the late Yasmin Ahmad to produce these TVCs. Thus, this paper is a visual analysis of the Petronas advertisements for one of the main religious festivals celebrated in Malaysia: Hari Raya Aidilfitri. The corpus selected for analysis is those TVCs directed by Yasmin Ahmad for Petronas between the years 1995 and 2008. The theoretical framework for the analysis of these social-commentary type commercials is the one proposed by Theo van Leeuwen.

Link

DOI: 10.1515/mult.2011.014, August 2011

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/mult.2011.30.issue-3-4/mult.2011.014/mult.2011.014.xml

12

Applied Linguistics

Reference

Rani Rubdy, T. Ruanni F. Tupas, Corazon D. Villareal, Maya Khemlani David, Dumanig, Francisco. 2011. Review of doctoral research in English language education in the Philippines, Singapore and Malaysia (2007-2010). Language Teaching, 44(04). pp.64-84.

Abstract

This review highlights recent doctoral research in English language education and related areas completed between 2007 and 2010 in three countries in Southeast Asia: Singapore, Malaysia and the Philippines. Out of sixty dissertations initially chosen from major universities in these countries, five from the Philippines, four from Malaysia and three from Singapore were selected for review, the selection being based mainly on their quality of work and representation of key areas of intellectual work in the field in these countries. This review shows how the shared postcolonial identities of these countries and their unique sociohistorical locations help explain the coalescing and diverging agendas and trajectories in English language education doctoral research in the region. Much of the work affirms the dominant intellectual position of the West as the producer of knowledge, so there is a need to reposition the intellectual stance of research in English language education in the region within and emerging from its multilingual but unequally globalizing landscapes. Thus, there is an urgent need for more nuanced attention to socio-cultural factors that impact on English language education in the three countries under review, which, in turn, can help scholars produce new knowledge that can contribute to academic conversations in the field.

Link

http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=EJ956202&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=EJ956202

13

Applied linguistics

Reference

Richard Powell and Azirah Hashim, 2011, Language Disadvantage in Malaysian Litigation and Arbitration, World Englishes, 30(1), pp. 92-105.

Abstract

Based on extensive observations of courtroom proceedings and more limited observations of arbitration practice, this study compares how each system approaches language disadvantage. In Malaysian common law the usual constraints on courtroom discourse, institutionalised by de jure rules of speaking and reinforced by professional practice, are supplemented by a language policy, enshrined in the constitution, statutes and judicial directives, which requires the use of Malay while also allowing English where deemed in the interests of justice. The result is a bilingual system, with all other languages admissible only through interpretation. In the fast-growing alternative dispute sector, however, there are few hard and fast rules governing either code choice or discourse. With most Malaysian arbitrations involving commercial disputes, English is the dominant medium, but as in the courts, English-Malay code-switching is common. Ways of speaking are generally more relaxed than in the courts, but with a majority of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) advocates coming from common law, many discursive practices are carried over. While the more relaxed atmosphere of ADR seems to encourage freer discourse than in the courts, there are some indications that current practice may be underestimating the needs of participants who are less proficient in English. The stricter rules imposed on courtroom discourse may inhibit free discussion but they do reveal a high awareness of the problems of language disadvantage.

Link

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-971X.2010.01689.x/abstract

14

Sociolinguistics

Reference

Wang Xiaomei and Chong Siew Ling, 2011, A hierarchical model for language maintenance and language shift, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 32(6), pp. 577-591.

Abstract

Social factors involved in language maintenance and language shift (LMLS) have been the focus of LMLS studies. Previous studies provide fundamental support for the theoretical development of this research branch. However, there is no discussion regarding the hierarchical order of these social factors, i.e. the degree of importance of various social factors in the process of LMLS in a specific multilingual society. This article aims to illustrate the hierarchy of population factor, settlement mode factor, and status and institutional support factor in the process of LMLS across various dialect groups in the Malaysian Chinese community in Kuala Lumpur. Based on the analysis of the decline of language proficiency, discontinuation of intergenerational transmission and decline of language use in public settings, a hierarchical model of LMLS is constructed.

Link

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01434632.2011.617820

15

Discourse studies

Reference

Zainon Shamsudin & Kamila Ghazali. 2011. A discursive construction of homosexual males in a Muslim-dominant community. Multilingua (Special Issue) - Journal of Cross-Cultural and Interlanguage Communication, Vol. 30 (3-4), pp. 279-304.

Abstract

This paper addresses the issue of identity construction of four young Malay homosexual men in Malaysia. Through narrative discourse of their lifeworlds (Habermas, Theory of communicative action, Polity Press, 1987), this study explores the participants' linguistic repertoire and discursive strategies in the formation, negotiation and establishment of their identities. Specifically, the aim is to investigate their identities as Muslims living a homosexual lifestyle in a predominantly heterosexual Muslim society. The narrative data were gathered through semi-structured interviews cum conversations which allowed the participants to express their sentiments about their lives in a heterosexual society. Using an adapted Critical Discourse Analysis framework proposed by Reisigl & Wodak (The discourse-historical approach (DHA), Sage, 2009), this study analyses the participants' emergent language use and discursive strategies in representing themselves and others and in disclosing their positions towards the dominant sexual ideology. There is evidence of their internal struggle between their desire to stay homosexual and their obligation to assimilate to the dominant sexual ideology.

Link

http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=EJ937850&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=EJ937850

16

Discourse studies

Reference

Zuraidah Mohd Don & Ahmad Izadi. 2011. Relational connection and separation in Iranian dissertation defences. Journal of Pragmatics, 43(15), pp. 3782-3792.

Abstract

This article examines ways in which participants achieve face in Iranian dissertation defences, while doing interactional work in their roles as candidate, examiner or supervisor. Following Arundale, we adopt the notion of face as an interactional and relational phenomenon which is conjointly co-constituted by participants as they conjointly co-constitute meanings and actions in talk-in-interaction. This dynamic conceptualization of face requires an approach grounded in Conversational Analysis. The data for analysis is taken from two PhD defence sessions conducted at Iranian universities. Selected segments of talk from the Question and Answer sessions during these dissertation defences were analyzed to investigate how participants achieve face. The data analysis shows that interpreting and doing relational work are not only influenced by the participants' culture but also by the institutional nature of the talk itself. When covert rules are flouted, the reaction from co-participants and the audience demonstrates disapproval of inappropriate behaviour.

Link

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/232724393_Relational_connection_and_separation_in_Iranian_dissertation_defences

 

 

 

 

 

REFEREED JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS

1.    Abdul Razaq Husin Ghalib & Haji Mohammad Seman. 2011. `Adhwaa' 'Ala Uslub Al-'Ijaz Al-Lughawiy Fi Al-Quran Al-Karim.  Jurnal Al-Dad. pp. 169 -189.

2.    Ain Nadzimah Abdullah, Rosli Talif, & Jariah Mohd Jan. 2011. Flowers in the Garden:  A Glance on Multilingualism in Malaysia.   Malaysian Journal of Languages and Linguistics, 1 (1), pp. 84-93.

3.    Amir Biglar Beigi & Karen Kow Yip Cheng. 2011. Rethinking the Concept of Masculinity and Feminity: Focusing on Iran's Female Students. Asian Journal of Social Science (AJSS), pp. 39.3.

4.    Animashaun, Maruf Suraqat & Salahuddin Mohd. Shamsuddin. 2011. Journal of Oriental African Studies. Vol. 20. 

5.    Ariffin Safar, Mohammad Seman, Wan Hassan, Zaharah Hussin. 2011. Sistem I'rab dalam Pendidikan Bahasa Arab: Satu Kajian Perbandingan antara Sibawayh dengan al-Sayutiy. Jurnal Pendidikan. Edisi Khas. pp. 258-272.

6.    Bahrani, T., & Tam, S. S. 2011. The role of audiovisual mass media news in language learning. English Language Teaching, 4(2), pp. 260-266.

7.     Dumanig, Francisco. 2011. Social Class, Gender and Speech: The Case of Filipino Children. JATI: Journal of South East Asian Studies. pp. 53-60.

8.    Dumanig, F. and David, M.K. 2011. Language Choice and Naming of Businesses as a Marketing Strategy: Focus on Malaysia and the Philippines. Language in India 11, pp. 33-41.

9.    David, M.K. and Dumanig, F. 2011. National Unity in Multi-ethnic Malaysia: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Tun Dr. Mahathir’s Political Speeches. RC25: Language, Discourse and Society. 1 (1), pp. 11-31.

10.  Gobel, P., Mori, S.,Thang, S.M., Kan, N.H. and Lee, K.W. 2011. The impact of culture on student attributions for performance: A comparative study of three groups of EFL/ESL learners. Journal of Institutional Research South East Asia, 9:1, pp. 27-43.

11.  Jamila Mohd & Musaev Talaibek. 2011. Konsep Gaya Bahasa Teineitai dan Futsutai dalam Perbualan Bahasa Jepun. Jurnal Bahasa dan Budaya Jepun. Jilid 2, pp. 63-75.

12.  Jawakhir Mior Jaafar. 2011. Meeting the teaching, learning and supervisory needs of a Deaf postgraduate student: A first time experience. Journal of Special Education, National Association of Special Education, Malaysia, 1 (1), pp. 111-120.

13.  Jayapalan K.  & Pillai, S. 2011. The State of Teaching and Learning English Pronunciation in Malaysia: A Preliminary Study. Malaysian Journal of ELT RESEARCH (MaJER), Volume 7/2, pp. 63-81.

14.  Jubilado, R. 2011. Of Language and Religion: The Coefficient of Weirdness in Funeral Prayers. JATI Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, 16, pp. 197-212.

15.  Kaur, Surinderpal, Yee, Wendy, Lean Mei Lee. 2011. Social networking and the Bersih Rally in Malaysia. Asian Conflicts Review. CATR. Issue 19.

16.  Kuang, C.H, Wong, N.L, David, M. 2011. "Communicating Disagreement among Malaysians: Verbal or Non-verbal". Language in India, Vol. 11 November Issue. e-journal. http://www.languageinindia.com

17.  Kuang Ching Hei. 2011. The Emergent Writng Forms of a Bilingual. POLYGLOSSIA The Asia-Pacific's Voice in Language and Language Teaching. Volume 20, pp. 45-54.

18.  Kuang, Ching Hei, Wong, Ngan Ling, Maya Khemlani David, 2011. Communicating Disagreements among Malaysians: Verbal or Non-Verbal?. Language In India. Volume 11:11, pp. 442-462.

19.  Kuang Ching Hei, Maya Khemlani David, Lau Su Kia & Ang Pei Soo. 2011. Openings and Closings in Front Counter Transactions of Malaysian Government Hospitals. SEARCH. Volume 3, Issue 1,  pp. 13-30.

20.  Kuang Ching Hei, 2011. The psychology of chinese behaviour as seen in spoken discourses. In Shi-xu, (ed.), Cultural China in Discursive Transformation: Special issue of Journal of Asian Pacific Communication. 21:1, pp. 281 303.

21.  Pogadaev, V. 2011. "Bahasa Melayu Merentas Sempadan", Jurnal Dewan Bahasa, Jilid 11, Bilangan 3 (Mac 2011), m.s. 52-56.

22.  Pogadaev, V. 2011. Ne Uznav Ne Polyubish (Belum Tahu Maka Belum Cinta). - in: Russkiy Vek (Russian Century), Moscow, N5, pp. 78-80.

23.  Pogadaev, V. 2011. Kamus di Malaysia: Lebih Banyak, Lebih Baik, Lebih Menarik, Jurnal Dewan Bahasa, Jilid 11, Bilangan 12, m.s. 28-30.

24.  Pogadaev, V. 2011. Innovatsionnie I Effectivnie Metodi Prepodavaniya Inostrannih Yazikov v Klasse (Innovative and Effective Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages in Class) Vostok (Oriens). Moscow, N2, pp. 179-180.

25.  Pogadaev, V. 2011. Ne Uznav Ne Polyubish (There is No Love Without Knowing) Russkiy Vek (Russian Century). Moscow, N5, pp. 78-79.

26.  Pogadaev, V. 2011. Russky Yazik v Sovremennom Mire (Russian in the Today s World) - Russkiy Mir (Russian Century).  Moscow, N6, pp. 63-64.

27.  Pogadaev, V. 2011. Rebab Berbisik Menampilkan Bakat Cemerlang Rosnan Rahman. Pentas, Jilid 6, bil. 2, pp. 48-49.

28.  Pogadaev, V. 2011. Bahasa Melayu Merentas Sempadan, Jurnal Dewan Bahasa, Jilid 11, bilangan 3, pp. 52-56.

29.  Pogadaev, V. 2011. Bahasa Membina Keperibadian Bangsa, Jurnal Dewan Bahasa, Oktober, pp. 47-50.

30.  Pogadaev, V. 2011. Kembalinya Seorang Penyair, Pentas, Jil. 6, Bil. 4 (Oktober - Disember), pp. 57- 58.

31.  Pogadaev, V. 2011. Natsional ny Pisatel Malayzii Anwar Ridhwan (Malaysian National Literary Laureat Anwar Ridhwan) Azia i Afrika Segodnya (Asia and Africa Today). Moscow: Russian Academy of Science, N 10, pp. 67.

32.  Wong, F.M., & Lean, M.L. 2011. "Vote for me!": A content analysis of news reports leading to the 12th general election political communication. SEARCH, 3(1), pp. 31-47.

33.  Wong, F.M., Lean, M.L., & Fernandez, P.R. “Mobile phone”: The must-have gadget of 21st century”: Identifying the trends and impact on human relationships. SEARCH, 3(2), pp. 39-54.

34.  Wong, F.M., Lean, M.L., & Fernandez, P.R. 2011. Social life connects the world: Malaysian youth's usage behaviour of social  network sites. International Journal of Arts & Sciences, 4(3), pp. 157-178.

35.  Yoong, D. 2011. Initiating, pausing, resuming, and ending police questioning: due process as interactional norms in an Australian police interrogation room. Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice, 5(3), pp. 248-264.

36.  Mat Taib Pa. 2011 . Journal “Al-Dad”, Vol.2, Department of Arabic and Middle Eastern Languages, Faculty of Languages and Linguistics, University of Malaya. pp. 69-89.

37.  Mohd. Zaki Abd. Rahman. 2011. Journal “Al-Dad”, Vol. 2, Department of Arabic and Middle Eastern Languages, Faculty of Languages and Linguistics, University of Malaya. pp. 33-48.

 

 

 


BOOKS

1.  Azirah Hashim, David, M. and McLellan, J. (eds). 2011. Text, Discourse and Society: Functional and Pragmatic Approaches to Language in Use, Peter Lang, Frankfurt.

2.  Kingsley Bolton and Azirah Hashim. (eds.) 2011. Malaysian English Language and Literature, Hong Kong University Press, Hong Kong.

3.  Lean, M.L, M.K. David, Ngeow, Y.M. (eds.) 2011. Bridging the Gap of Cross-Cultural Communication. Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press.

4.  Mohd. Zaki Abd. Rahman & Che Radiah Mezah. 2011. Mukhtasar Pertumbuhan Bahasa Arab, Dialeknya dan Ilmu-ilmunya. Serdang. Penerbit Universiti Putra Malaysia.

5.  Pogadaev, V. (ed.) 2011. Malayskaya Krov Rasskazi (Darah Melayu. Kumpulan Cerpen). Moscow: Klyuch-S, 2011.

6.  Salahuddin Mohd Shamsuddin & Haji Mohammad Seman. 2011. Ahammiyat Tadris Al-Arabiyyat.Ta'lim Al-Arabiyyat Li Ghair Al-Natiqin Biha: Istiratijiyyat Wa Maharat. Apium Nilam Puri.

7.  Severy, J. 2011. French Grammar Exercise Book: Practice Makes Perfect. Kuala Lumpur, Pelanduk Publications, pp. 220.

8.  Shanmuganathan, T.  2011. Negotiation at the Workplace: An Ethnography Conversation Analysis. VDM Verlag Dr. Müller GmbH & Co. KG.

9.  Zuraidah Mohd Don. (ed.) 2011. English in Multicultural Malaysia: Pedagogy and Applied Research. Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press.

 

 

CHAPTER IN BOOK

1.    Azirah Hashim and Norizah Hassan. 2011.  Genre Analysis . In Azirah H, David, M & Mclellan, J. (eds) Text, Discourse and Society, Frankfurt:  Peter Lang, pp. 143-163.

2.    Coluzzi Paolo.  2011. 'Multilingual Societies vs. Monolingual States: the Linguistic Landscape of Italy and Brunei Darussalam. In Durk Gorter, Luk Van Mensel and Heiko F. Marten (eds.) Minority Languages in the Linguistic Landscape, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 225-242.

3.    David, M.K. 2011. Learning Cultural Norms of Discourse through Texts in English in Multicultural Malaysia:  Pedagogy and Applied Research, UM Press. pp.179-194.

4.    Ding, Seong Lin. 2011. Between Exclamation and Joke: An analysis of Ouyang Xiu S Historical Writings. In Wang Shuizhao & Zhu Gang, eds., The Establishment and Development of the Ancient Chinese Writings-ology, Shanghai: Fudan University Press, pp. 240-258.

5.    Ding, Seong Lin.  2011. Yingzhou in the Writings of Ouyang Xiu: A Discourse Analysis. In Zhou Yukai, ed., Collected Papers of the Literature in Song Dynasty, Chengdu: Bashu Publisher. pp 95-118.

6.    Ding, Seong Lin. 2011. Reading Beyond the Text. In Fan, Pik Hwa & Yang Zonghan eds., Collected Works of Fu Chengde, Taibei: Showwe Information Co. Ltd. pp. 5-20.

7.    Dumanig, F.P. and David, M.K. 2011. Malaysian-Filipino Couples and Language Choice: International language or heritage language? . In D. Mukerjee and M.K. David (eds). National language planning and language shifts in Malysian Minority  communities: Speaking in many tongues: Language shifts in Malaysian minority communities and the effects of national language planning. Amsterdam University Press: Amsterdam, pp. 71-86.

8.    Dumanig, Francisco and David, Maya Khemlani. 2011. Language Use and Bilingual Consumers: Analysis of Print Advertisement in Multilingual Malaysia. In Lean, M.L, M.K. David, Ngeow, Y.M (eds.). Bridging the Gap of Cross-Cultural Communication, Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press. pp. 217-226.

9.    Dumanig, Francisco. 2011. Philippine and Malaysian Varieties of English : Miscommunication in Intercultural Interactions.  In Lean, M.L, M.K. David, Ngeow, Y.M (eds.). Bridging the Gap of Cross-Cultural Communication, Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press. pp. 89-100.

10.  Dipika, M. & David, M.K. (eds.) 2011. Introduction: Language Policies at Variance with Language Use in Multilingual Malaysia.  In Mukherjee, D & David, M.K. (eds) National Language Planning and Language Shifts in Malaysian Minority Communities: Speaking in Many Tongues. Amsterdam: IIAS/Amsterdam University Press. pp 14-23.

11.  Jariah Mohd Jan. 2011. Malay Javanese Migrants in Malaysia: Contesting or Creating Identity? In Dipika Mukherjee and M.K. David (Eds). National Language Planning and Language Shifts in Malaysian Minority Communities: Speaking in Many Tongues (IIAS Publications Series), Netherlands: Amsterdam University Press. pp.163-172.

12.  Jariah Mohd Jan. 2011. Gender Differences in Teaching and Learning Technical Subject Areas. In Zuraidah Mohd Don. (ed.) 2011. English in Multicultural Malaysia: Pedagogy and Applied Research. Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press. pp. 142-152.

13.  Jariah Mohd Jan.  2011. Language and Gender. In Azirah Hashim, Maya Khemlani David and James McLellan (eds.), Text, Discourse and Society: Functional and Pragmatic Approaches to Language in Use, Peter Lang: Frankfurt. Band/Volume 86, pp. 34-47.

14.  Kärchner-Ober, Renate, Dipika,M & David, M.K. 2011. Conclusions: Multilinguality in the Malaysian Context of Nation-Building and Globalisation. In Dipika, M & David, M.K. (eds). Speaking in Many Tongues Language Shifts in Malaysian Minority Communities and the Effects of National Language Planning. IIAS/ICAS Publications Series: Amsterdam: University of Amsterdam Press. pp. 174-185.

15.  Karunakaran, K. 2011. Pembinaan Kata dalam Suasana Multilingual. In K. Karunakaran et al. (eds.). Tamil in Multilingual Malaysia, Terbitan Jabatan Bahasa-bahasa Malaysia dan Linguistik Terapan, Fakulti Bahasa dan Linguistik, pp. 19-32.

16.  Kaur, J. 2011. 'Doing being a language expert': the case of the ELF speaker, in Alasdair Archibald, Alessia Cogo & Jennifer Jenkins (Eds.), Latest Trends in ELF Research. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 107-123.

17.  Kaur, K. 2011. A Study of the Problems Faced by Translators of Scientific and Technical Texts from English to Malay and Implications for Teaching. In Zuraidah Mohd Don. (ed.) 2011. English in Multicultural Malaysia: Pedagogy and Applied  Research. Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press. pp. 95-106.

18.  Khan, M. H. & Kamila Ghazali. 2011. Critical Discourse Analysis. In Azirah Hashim, David, M. and McLellan, J. (eds). 2011. Text, Discourse and Society: Functional and Pragmatic Approaches to Language in Use, Peter Lang, Frankfurt. pp. 164-176.

19.  Khor, S. H. 2011. Medical Consultations in a Malaysian Primary Care Clinic – Implications for the Teaching of Communication Skills. In Zuraidah Mohd Don. (ed.) 2011. English in Multicultural Malaysia: Pedagogy and Applied Research. Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press. pp. 127-141.

20.  Kow Yip Cheng. 2011. Putting Second Language Acquisition Theories into Practice: A Case Study. In Zuraidah Mohd Don. (ed.) 2011. English in Multicultural Malaysia: Pedagogy and Applied Research. Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press. pp. 33-47.

21.  Kuang Ching Hei. 2011. Address Forms with Insiders and Outsiders: Focus on Malaysians. In Lean, M.L, M.K. David, Ngeow, Y.M (eds.). Bridging the Gap of Cross-Cultural Communication, Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press. pp. 37-56.

22.  Lean, M.L., Fernandez, P.R., & Wong, F.M. 2011. “Hear Me Out”: A Content Analysis of Political Writings in Blogs. In Lean, M.L., David, M.K., & Ngeow, Y.M. (Eds.) Bridging the gap of cross-cultural communication, SKET: UM Press. pp.189-204.

23.  M. Mannar Mannan. 2011. Bahasa Tamil dalam institusi Pengajian Tinggi: Fakta dan cabaran. In K. Karunakaran et al. (eds.).  Tamil in Multilingual Malaysia, Terbitan Jabatan Bahasa-bahasa Malaysia dan Linguistik Terapan, Fakulti Bahasa dan  Linguistik, pp. 105-109.

24.  Mohsen Shahrokhi and Jariah Mohd Jan. 2011. A Study of Direct Request Realization in Male Discourse. In Ambigapathy Pandian et al. (eds.). Forging Unity Amidst Diversity: From the Classroom and Beyond, School of Languages, Literacies and Translation, Universiti Sains Malaysia, pp. 50-60.

25.  Mohsen Shahrokhi and Jariah Mohd Jan. 2011. A Cross-Cultural Study of external Request Modifications in Persian. In Lean Mei Li, Maya Khemlani David and Ngew Yeok Meng (eds.). Gridging the Gap of Cross-Cultural Communication, University of Malaya Press: Kuala Lumpur, pp.19-36.

26.  M.K.David and Caesar, D. 2011. Ethnic Identity in The Tamil Community of Kuching. In Dipika, M & David, M.K. (eds). Speaking in Many Tongues Language Shifts in Malaysian Minority Communities and the Effects of National Language Planning.  IIAS/ICAS Publications Series: Amsterdam: University of Amsterdam Press. pp. 44-59.

27.  M.K.David and Caesar, D. 2011. Do Exogamous Marriages Result in Language Shift? Focus on the Sindhis of Kuching, Malaysia. In Dipika, M & David, M.K. (eds). Speaking in Many Tongues Language Shifts in Malaysian Minority Communities and the Effects of National Language Planning. IIAS/ICAS Publications Series: Amsterdam: University of Amsterdam Press. pp. 60-71.

28.  M.K.David and Ceasar, D.  2011. Language and Identity: Childeren of Indian Bidayuh Mixed Marriages. In Dipika, M & David, M.K. (eds). Speaking in Many Tongues Language Shifts in Malaysian Minority Communities and the Effects of National Language Planning. IIAS/ICAS Publications Series: Amsterdam: University of Amsterdam Press. pp. 102-115.

29.  Nambiar, M. 2011. The Impact of Language Policy on Language Shifts in Minority Communities: Focus on the Malayalee Community in Malaysia. In Mukherjee, D & David, M.K. (eds) National Language Planning and Language Shifts in Malaysian Minority Communities: Speaking in Many Tongues. Amsterdam: IIAS/Amsterdam University Press. pp. 116-127.

30.  Nambiar, M. 2011. ‘Teaching MUET, not English’: A Study of the Washback Effect of the Malaysian University English Test (MUET). In Zuraidah Mohd Don. (ed.) 2011. English in Multicultural Malaysia: Pedagogy and Applied Research. Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press. pp. 48-58.

31.  Ong, L.T. 2011. An Analysis of the Communicative Acts of Tour Guides at the Workplace: Implications for Teaching in English in Multicultural Malaysia:  Pedagogy and Applied Research, UM Press. pp. 107-126.

32.  Pillai, S. & Don, Z. M. 2011. Towards Building a Model of Standard Malaysian English Pronunciation. In Zuraidah Mohd Don. (ed.) 2011. English in Multicultural Malaysia: Pedagogy and Applied Research. Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press. pp. 167-181.

33.  Pillai S., & Khan, M. H. 2011. I am not English but my First Language is English: English as a First Language Among Portuguese Eurasians in Malaysia. In Mukherjee, D. & David, M K (eds.). National Language Planning & Language Shifts in Malaysian Minority Communities: Speaking in Many Tongues (IIAS Publications Series). Amsterdam University Press. pp. 97-100.

34.  Pogadaev, V. 2011. Demi Kegemilangan Sastera Melayu. In Abdulhadi Muhamad, Rosli K. Matari, Azmi Yusoff, Rahimidin Zahari. ABRAR. Kumpulan Sajak. Kota Bharu: Persatuan Penulis Kelantan.

35.  R. Krishnan. 2011. Pelbagai gaya stailistik dalam novel Tamil: dari perspektif  sosiolinguistik. In K. Karunakaran et al. (eds.).  Tamil in Multilingual Malaysia, Terbitan Jabatan Bahasa-bahasa Malaysia dan Linguistik Terapan, Fakulti Bahasa dan Linguistik, pp. 173-183.

36.  S. Supramani. 2011. ‘Language Shift’ dalam kalangan pelajar-pelajar Tamil di sekolah Kebangsaan: satu kajian Sosiolinguistik. In K. Karunakaran et al. (eds.). Tamil in Multilingual Malaysia, Terbitan Jabatan Bahasa-bahasa Malaysia dan  Linguistik Terapan, Fakulti Bahasa dan Linguistik, pp.111-119.

37.  Shanmuganathan, T. 2011. Assimilation in Diversity: International Postgraduates in Multicultural Malaysia. In Lean Mei Li, Maya Khemlani David and Ngew Yeok Meng (eds.). Gridging the Gap of Cross-Cultural Communication, University of Malaya Press:  Kuala Lumpur, pp.125- 140.

38.  Sriniwass, Sridevi. 2011. Systemic Functional Linguistics. Azirah Hashim, David, M and McLellan, J. (eds), Text, Discourse and Society:  Functional and Pragmatic Approaches to Language Use, Peter Lang: Frankfurt. Band/Volume 86, pp. 177-215.

39.  Wan Hassan Wan Mat. 2011. Contoh Peribahasa Arab Dalam Islam. Jabatan Bahasa Arab dan Bahasa-Bahasa Timur Tengah, Fakulti Bahasa dan Linguistik. University of Malaya Press: Kuala Lumpur, pp. 49-68.

40.  Yamaguchi, Toshiko. 2011. Authenticity in the Japanese language classroom. In Ambigapathy Pandian, Tan, Siew Bek Sunny and Shaik Abdul Malik Mohamed Ismail (eds.). Teaching and Learning Language: Current Trends and Practices. Penang: USM Press, pp. 128-137.

41.  Zuraidah Mohd Don. 2011. English in its Context of Situation. In Zuraidah Mohd Don. (ed.) 2011. English in Multicultural Malaysia: Pedagogy and Applied Research. Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press. pp. 7-17.

42.  Zuraidah Mohd Don. 2011. Pragmatics. In Azirah Hashim, David, M and McLellan, J.(eds). Text, Discourse and Society: Functional and Pragmatic Approaches to Language in Use.  Frankfurt: Peter Lang. pp. 116 – 142.

 

 

 

 

PROCEEDINGS

1.    Clarence Jerry, Jariah Mohd. Jan and Moses Samuel. 2011. Assessing and Giving Feedback to Students’ Written Work: Closing the Gap Between Expert Raters and Novice Raters' Knowledge and Skills in Muhammad Kamarul Kabilan Abdullah, Tan Kok Eng, Normala Othman and Too Wei Keong (eds.). Proceeding of the 20th MELTA International Conference 2011: English Language Education and Global Learning: Policy, Practice, Performance, Kuala Terengganu, 30 May – 1 June, pp. 171-188.

2.    Clarence Jerry, Moses Samuel and Jariah Mohd Jan. 2011. Learning from the Experts: A Comparative Study between Expert and Novice Teachers in Assessing ESL Writing, Proceedings of the New Directions: Assessment and Evaluation Symposium, British Council Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 6 - 8 July.

3.    Clarence Jerry, Moses Samuel and Jariah Mohd. Jan. 2011. Assessing and giving feedback to students’ written work: A comparison between expert raters and novice raters using verbal protocol analysis, Proceedings from Seminar Penyelidikan Pendidikan Zon Sarawak Tahun 2011, IPG Kampus Tun Abdul Razak, Kota Samarahan, Sarawak, 27 – 29 July.

4.    Cheah Seng, 2011 The History of Sirius Poetical Society. Prosiding Persidangan Kajian Kesusasteraan Cina di China dan Malaysia, pp.13-29.

5.    Chua Yan Piaw & Zuraidah Mohd Don. 2011. A Grounded theory for Research Implementation in Schools. Proceedings of International Conference on Applied Social Sciences ICASS 2011. Volume 2, pp413- 417, 19-21 March, Changsha, China.[ISI  Web of Science ISTP-CPCI].

6.    Dumanig, F.P and David, M.K. 2011. Competeing Roles of the National Language and English in Malaysia and the Philippines: Planning, Policy and Use. Paper presented at the 21st Annual Conference of Southeast Asian Linguistic Society, Bangkok, Kasetsart University, 11-13 May.

7.    Dumanig, F., David, M.K. & Jubilado, R. 2011. Computer- Mediated Reading and its Impact on Learners' Reading Comprehension Skills. 10th European Conference on e- learning ECEL-2011. Brighton. Brighton University (ISI-Cited Publication) ECEL 2011 acceptance.pdf

8.    Jamila Mohd & Talaibek Musaev.  2011. Greeting Expressions Usage in Foreign Language Learning and Second Language Learning Environment. 6th International Qualitative Research Convention. The Mosaic of Qualitative Research: Theory and Practice, pp. 52-53.

9.    Jean Severy. 2011. The effective use of films in the foreign language classroom. Department of Asian and European Languages Selected Articles from the DAEL 2010 Symposium. Faculty of Languages and Linguistics. University of Malaya, 1,  pp. 20-28.

10.  Kuang Ching Hei. 2011. Chartering a New Phase in Life After 50: The Voice of an Elderly Woman. Proceeding of ICLLL-International Conference on Lifelong Learning 2011. Transforming Nations through Enculturation of Lifelong Learning. Open University Malaysia. November 14-15, 2011, Seri Pacific, KL. pp 484-496.

11.  Mumtaz, B. M., Ainon, R.N., Roziati, Z., Zuraidah, M. D. & Knowles, G. 2011.  A cross lingual approach to the development of an HMM-based speech synthesis system for Malay. In Proc. Interspeech, Florence, Italy, pp. 3197-3200.

12.  Mumtaz B.M., Ainon, R.N. , Zainuddin, R., Zuraidah, M.D. & G. Knowles. 2011. “Assessing the naturalness of Malay emotional voice corpora,” 2011 International Conference on Speech Database and Assessments (Oriental COCOSDA), Hsinchu, Taiwan, October 26-28.

13.  Park, Jun Seok. 2011. The system of adverbial case markers in Korean, Transmission and Translation Studies Agency, Shandong University, Weihai, China,  8 January.

14.  Park, Jun Seok. 2011. The study of the particles and prepositions in Korean and Malaysian languages for Korean education as a foreign language: the perspective on contrastive linguistics, the 1st Western Pacific-Asia Conference on Korean Studies, Department of Korean language and literature, Chinese culture university, Taipei, Taiwan R.O.C., 28 June.

15.  Salahuddin Mohd. Shamsudin. 2011. The International Conference on “Reconstruction of religious discourse in contemporary Islamic media” Muslim World League in Mecca, Jakarta, Indonesia, 13-15 December.

16.  Sameer Kumar and Jariah Mohd. Jan. 2011. Social Networks and the Business Value of Social Media, Proceedings from the International Conference on Humanities, Society and Culture (ICHSC 2011), Kuala Lumpur,  4-6 November. (Conference proceedings is ISI-indexed in Web of Science).

17.  Victor Pogadaev. 2011. Some Aspects of Poetic Translation from Russian into Malay - Prosiding Kongres Antarabangsa Bahasa dan Budaya, Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei, 17-18 September.

 

 

 

 





 

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